Lethbridge, Alberta

Saturday, September 21, 2019

Main Library: 5th Ave. S. and 8th St. S. | 11am - 5pm

Change Location
Menu

Select your Location:

X

Schedule

The Word On The Street has been renowned for the quality and diversity of its event programming and our next festival promises to offer the best so far. Please see the 2019 schedule below!

Signing – Tania Carter, Erin Dingle, Eric Dyck, Susan Forest, Christian Guay-Poliquin, Hazel Hutchins, Alex Lyttle, Sabina Khan, Lee Maracle, J. Torres

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Hope Matters

Hope Matters, written by multiple award-winner Lee Maracle, in collaboration with her daughters Columpa Bobb and Tania Carter, focuses on the journey of Indigenous people from colonial beginnings to reconciliation.

Maracle states that the book, “is also about the journey of myself and my two daughters.” During their youth, Bobb and Carter wrote poetry with their mother, and eventually they all decided that one day they would write a book together. This book is the result of that dream.

Written collaboratively by all three women, the poems in Hope Matters blend their voices together into a shared song of hope and reconciliation.

  • Biography & Memoir
  • Poetry

Tania Carter

Tania Carter is an actor, playwright and poet whose work has appeared in anthologies and scholarly journals. A member of the Sto:lo Nation, she holds a BA in World Literature and a Masters Degree in Theatre, with a specialization in Playwriting. After living in Toronto for twenty years, she now lives in British Columbia.

Hope Matters

Hope Matters, written by multiple award-winner Lee Maracle, in collaboration with her daughters Columpa Bobb and Tania Carter, focuses on the journey of Indigenous people from colonial beginnings to reconciliation.

Maracle states that the book, “is also about the journey of myself and my two daughters.” During their youth, Bobb and Carter wrote poetry with their mother, and eventually they all decided that one day they would write a book together. This book is the result of that dream.

Written collaboratively by all three women, the poems in Hope Matters blend their voices together into a shared song of hope and reconciliation.

  • Biography & Memoir
  • Poetry

Lee Maracle

Lee Maracle is the author of a number of critically acclaimed works including: Ravensong, Bobbi Lee Indian Rebel, Daughters Are Forever, Celia’s Song (which was long listed for CBC Canada Reads and a finalist for the ReLit Award), I Am Woman, First Wives Club, Talking to the Diaspora, Memory Serves: Oratories, and My Conversations with Canadians, which was a finalist for the 2018 Toronto Book Award and the First Nation Communities READ 2018-19 Award, and continues to be a nonfiction bestseller. She is also the co-editor of the award-winning My Home As I Remember. Maracle has served as Distinguished Visiting Scholar at the University of Toronto, the University of Waterloo, and the University of Western Washington. Maracle received the J.T. Stewart Award, the Premier’s Award for Excellence in the Arts, the Blue Metropolis Festival First Peoples Prize, the Harbourfront Festival Prize, and the Anne Green Award. Maracle received an Honorary Doctor of Letters from St. Thomas University, is a recipient of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal and is an Officer of the Order of Canada. A member of the Sto:lo Nation, Maracle currently lives in Toronto and teaches at the University of Toronto.

Bursts of Fire

Bursts of Fire begins an epic political fantasy of revenge, addictions, and redemption. In an empire where magic has become suspect, love and loyalty–for one’s lover, one’s family, one’s country–are tested. If Heaven desires the very earth be burned, what place can those below hope for, when the flames come for them?

The Falkyn sisters bear a burden and a legacy. Their mother, the imperial magiel of the kingdom of Orumon, protects her people from the horrors of the afterlife by calling upon the Gods with a precious Prayer Stone. But war among the kingdoms has brought fire and destruction to their sheltered world. When a mad king’s desire to destroy the Prayer Stones shatters their family, the three girls are scattered to the wilderness, relying on their wits and powers they don’t yet master.

Assassin. Battle tactician. Magic wielder. Driven by different ambitions, Meg, Janat, and Rennika are destined to become all these and more. To reclaim their birth right, they must overcome doubtful loyalties within a rising rebellion; more, they must challenge a dogma-driven chancellor’s influence on the prince raised to inherit his father’s war: a prince struggling to unravel the mystery of his brother’s addiction to Heaven.

To survive. To fight. To restore balance.

  • Fantasy/Sci-fi
  • Fiction

Susan Forest

Susan Forest grew up in a family of mountaineers and skiers, and she loves adventure. She also loves the big ideas found in SF/F, and finds fast-paced adventure stories a great place to explore how individuals grapple with complex moral decisions.  Susan is also an award-winning fiction editor, has published over 25 short stories,  and has appeared at many international writing conventions. She loves travel and has been known to dictate novels from the back of her husband’s motorcycle.

 

Follow her at addictedtoheaven.com and speculative-fiction.ca.

The Weight of Snow

A badly injured man. A nationwide power failure. A village buried in snow. A desperate struggle for survival. These are the ingredients of The Weight of Snow, Christian Guay-Poliquin’s riveting new novel. After surviving a major accident, the book’s protagonist is entrusted to Matthias, a taciturn old man who agrees to heal his wounds in exchange for supplies and a chance of escape. The two men become prisoners of the elements and of their own rough confrontation as the centimetres of snow accumulate relentlessly. Surrounded by a nature both hostile and sublime, their relationship oscillates between commiseration, mistrust, and mutual aid. Will they manage to hold out against external threats and intimate pitfalls?

  • Fiction

Christian Guay Poliquin

Christian Guay-Poliquin was born  just north of the US border in Saint-Armand, Québec in 1982. Le fil des kilometers, his first novel, was published  by both La Pleuplade and Bibliothèque québécoise in Québec, and by Phébus in France. It appeared in English as Running on Fumes (Talonbooks, 2016). The Weight of Snow is being translated into nine languages (includimg Spanish, Italian, German, and Czech), and is enjoying great public and critical success in France and Québec. He is now developing a thesis project on the hunting narrative and also works in renovation. The pencil on his ear serves to mark his measures as much as it does to record his ideas.

Anna at the Art Museum

Going to the Art Museum with her mom is no fun at all for Anna. Everything is old and boring and there are so many rules: Don’t Touch! Do Not Enter! Quiet! A vigilant guard keeps a close eye on the energetic little girl, but even so, Anna manages to set off an alarm and almost tip over a vase.

A half-open door draws Anna’s attention, but the No Entry sign means yet again that it’s off-limits. This time, however, the guard surprises her by inviting her to go in. Here she finds a “secret workshop” where paintings are being cleaned and repaired. Staring out from one of the canvases is a girl who looks grumpy and bored—just like Anna herself. With the realization that art often imitates life, Anna discovers the sheer joy to be had from the paintings on the wall, especially those that reflect what is happening all around her.

Filled with representations of paintings from many world-class galleries, this charming book is the perfect prelude to a child’s first visit to an art museum.

  • Children's

Hazel Hutchins

Hazel Hutchins has written over 50 books for children and young adults and has received numerous awards for her work including her latest picture book, Anna at the Art Museum (2018). She lives in Canmore, Alberta.

From Ant to Eagle

My name is Calvin Sinclair, I’m eleven years old and I have a confession… I killed my brother.
It’s the summer before grade six and Calvin Sinclair is bored to tears. He’s recently moved from a big city to a small town and there’s nothing to do. It’s hot, he has no friends and the only kid around is his six-year-old brother, Sammy, who can barely throw a basketball as high as the hoop. Cal occupies his time by getting his brother to do almost anything: from collecting ants to doing Calvin’s chores. And Sammy is all too eager – as long as it means getting a “Level” and moving one step closer to his brother’s Eagle status.
When Calvin meets Aleta Alvarado, a new girl who shares his love for Goosebumps books and adventure, Sammy is pushed aside. Cal feels guilty but not enough to change. At least not until a diagnosis causes things at home to fall apart and he’s left wondering whether Sammy will ever complete his own journey…
From Ant to Eagle.
  • Children's
  • Middle Grade

Alex Lyttle

Alex Lyttle is a pediatrician living in Calgary, Alberta with his wife and four children. His first novel, From Ant to Eagle, was based on his experiences as a doctor and won several awards. The Rise of Winter steps away from the medical world and enters that of fantasy – a world created during bedtime stories for his eldest daughter. When not working or writing, Alex enjoys… well… it doesn’t really matter what he enjoys because he mainly just chases toddlers around the house.

The Love and Lies of Rukhsana Ali

Seventeen-year-old Rukhsana Ali has always been fascinated by the universe around her and the laws of physics that keep everything in order. But her life at home isn’t so absolute.

Unable to come out to her conservative Muslim parents, she keeps that part of her identity hidden. And that means keeping her girlfriend, Ariana, a secret from them too. Luckily, only a few more months stand between her carefully monitored life at home and a fresh start at Caltech in the fall. But when Rukhsana’s mom catches her and Ariana together, her future begins to collapse around her.

Devastated and confused, Rukhsana’s parents whisk her off to stay with their extended family in Bangladesh where, along with the loving arms of her grandmother and cousins, she is met with a world of arranged marriages, religious tradition, and intolerance. Fortunately, Rukhsana finds allies along the way and, through reading her grandmother’s old diary, finds the courage to take control of her future and fight for her love.

A gritty novel that doesn’t shy away from the darkest corners of ourselves, The Love and Lies of Rukhsana Ali provides a timely and achingly honest portrait of what it’s like to grow up feeling unwelcome in your own culture and proves that love, above all else, has the power to change the world.

  • Fiction
  • LGTBQ+
  • Young Adult

Sabina Khan

Sabina Khan writes about Muslim teens who straddle cultures. She was born in Germany, spent her teens in Bangladesh, and lived in Macao, Illinois, and Texas before settling down in British Columbia with her husband, two daughters, and the best puppy in the world. Visit her online at sabina-khan.com.

How to Spot a Sasquatch

On a camping trip with the Junior Rangers, Jay feels like the odd one out. He’s determined to get a photo of Bigfoot—but none of his friends believe Bigfoot exists. But if there’s no such thing as Bigfoot, why is there a giant footprint? And who is stealing all the snacks?

Meanwhile, Sass the Sasquatch and her curious forest friends are playing practical jokes on the campers. On the last day of camp, disaster strikes when Jay falls into a rushing river. Sass comes out of the woodwork—despite her parents’ warnings to stay away from humans!—just in time to save his life. Soon after, Jay and Sass become fast friends, proving that nothing is impossible when it comes to friendship.

Told in ten short chapters, this is an accessible book with an action-packed story line perfect for building early literacy skills, with sequential illustrations that provide contextual clues to the text.

  • Children's
  • Comics & Graphic Novels
  • Middle Grade

J. Torres

Torres is a Filipino Canadian comic book writer perhaps best known for his work on Teen Titans Go for DC Comics. Other notable works include the Eisner Award-nominated Alison Dare, the Parents Choice Award-winning Brobots, and the Junior Library Guild section How to Spot a Sasquatch. Among other accolades is a Shuster Award for “Outstanding Writer” for his work on Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight, Love as a Foreign Language, and Teen Titans. More information at: http://www.jtorrescomics.com

Eric Dyck

Eric Dyck is a cartoonist and art educator living in Lethbridge, AB. He has shared his love of cartoons and comic-storytelling in art galleries, museums, schools and libraries throughout Alberta and New Brunswick. Eric has been documenting his experiences and adventures in Southern Alberta through his webcomic, Slaughterhouse Slough. Eric uses his comic strip to share about the people that he meets, the stories that he hears and as a means of learning more about the history of Southern Alberta.

 

http://www.ericdyck.com/

Erin Dingle

Erin Dingle tells it like it is. Whether it’s sad, silly, science or NSFW, they “take that confused feeling or idea you’ve never had words for and paint it into poetry you’ll understand.”  Dingle talked her way onto the Finals stage at the Canadian Independent Poetry Slam competition five years in a row. She placed 2nd in 2015. In 2016, she received the first Zaccheus Jackson Nyce Memorial Award for Poetry and Community Spirit.  Dingle has rocked the mic for Ted-x, the YWCA, the Peter Gzowski Invitational, Poverty Talks, and numerous other poetry and spoken word festivals across Canada. She teaches classes and workshops on exploring emotional resilience through writing and performance in Calgary schools, camps like fYrefly and Wordsworth and at multiple other youth and adult events.

Check out www.digitaldingle.com to learn more!