Lethbridge, Alberta

Saturday, September 21, 2019

Main Library: 5th Ave. S. and 8th St. S. | 11am - 5pm

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Schedule

The Word On The Street has been renowned for the quality and diversity of its event programming and our next festival promises to offer the best so far. Please see the 2019 schedule below!

Signing – Anne Emery, Karlynn Johnston, Caryn Lix, Fred Penner, Lorimer Shenher, Audrey Whitson, Teresa Wong

2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Though the Heavens Fall

As 1995 dawns in the North of Ireland, Belfast is a city of army patrols, bombed-out buildings, and “peace walls” segregating one community from the other. But the IRA has called a ceasefire. So, it’s as good a time as any for Monty Collins and Father Brennan Burke to visit the city: Monty to do a short gig in a law firm, and Brennan to reconnect with family. And it’s a good time for Brennan’s cousin Ronan to lay down arms and campaign for election in a future peacetime government.

But the past is never past in Belfast, and it rises up to haunt them all: a man goes off a bridge on a dark, lonely road; a rogue IRA enforcer is shot; and a series of car bombs remains an unsolved crime. The trouble is compounded by a breakdown in communication: Brennan knows nothing about the secrets in a file on Monty’s desk. And Monty has no idea what lies behind a late-night warning from the IRA. With a smoking gun at the center of it all, Brennan and Monty are on a collision course and will learn more than they ever wanted to know about what passes for law in 1995 Belfast. An inscription on a building south of the Irish border says it all: “Let justice be done though the heavens fall.”

  • Fiction
  • Mystery & Suspense

Anne Emery

Named “one of Canada’s finest novelists” (Ottawa Review of Books), Anne Emery is a lawyer and the author of the Collins-Burke mystery series. She has won an Arthur Ellis Award, an Independent Publisher Book Awards silver medal, and a Dartmouth Book Award. She lives in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Though the Heavens Fall is her tenth novel.

The Prairie Table: Suppers, Potlucks & Socials: Crowd-Pleasing Recipes to Bring People Together

Featuring more than 100 recipes–from salads to vegetable dishes; home-baked breakfasts to easy main meals; crowd-pleasing appetizers to portable desserts; a chapter dedicated to the Ukrainian heritage of the prairies, and much more!–The Prairie Table is filled with Karlynn’s approachable and tasty dishes. Paired with gorgeous photography and candid stories, every recipe in this book can easily be cut in half for a smaller family meal or doubled for a large event, and there are even quick “cheater” recipes for when you are in a hurry. You can then complement each dish with the array of cocktails and mocktails featured in the final chapter of the book, written by special guest and popular Kitchen Magpie contributor, Karlynn’s husband Mike (aka Mr. Kitchen Magpie).

Whether it’s Grandma Ellen’s Cold Picnic Barbecue Fried Chicken, perfect for a hot summer day; Sweet and Sour Meatballs to bring to your community potluck; Mango, Avocado, and Arugula Salad that even the pickiest of eaters will love; Piña Colada Sour Cream Squares for unexpected visitors; or pitcher-friendly cocktails like Strawberry Rhubarb Gin Fizz, The Prairie Table brings quintessential prairie cooking to kitchens everywhere.

  • Cooking
  • Nonfiction

Karlynn Johnston

Full-time professional blogger, baker, and recipe maker KARLYNN JOHNSTON can usually be found fluffing her culinary feathers on her award-winning website, The Kitchen Magpie. When she’s not there, she’s busy avoiding her deadlines by sneaking away to eat at her favorite Edmonton restaurants, finding a new bourbon cocktail to drink, or playing on social media. Karlynn lives in Edmonton, Canada, with her husband and two children.

 

www.thekitchenmagpie.com

Containment (A Sanctuary Novel)

In the thrilling second book in a series best described as Alien meets The Darkest Minds, Kenzie and her friends find themselves on the run and up against another alien invasion headed towards Earth.

They may have escaped Sanctuary, but Kenzie and her friends are far from safe.

Ex-Omnistellar prison guard Kenzie and her superpowered friends barely made it off Sanctuary alive. Now they’re stuck in a stolen alien ship with nowhere to go and no one to help them. Kenzie is desperate for a plan, but she doesn’t know who to trust anymore. Everyone has their own dark secrets: Omnistellar, her parents, even Cage. Worse still, she’s haunted by memories of the aliens who nearly tore her to shreds—and forced her to accidentally kill one of the Sanctuary prisoners, Matt.

When Kenzie intercepts a radio communication suggesting that more aliens are on their way, she knows there’s only one choice: They must destroy the ship before the aliens follow the signal straight to them. Because if the monstrous creatures who attacked Sanctuary reach Earth, then it’s game over for humanity.

What Kenzie doesn’t know is that the aliens aren’t the only ones on the hunt. Omnistellar has put a bounty on Kenzie’s head—and the question is whether the aliens or Omnistellar get to her first.

  • Fantasy/Sci-fi
  • Young Adult

Caryn Lix

Caryn Lix has been writing since she was a teenager and delved deep into science fiction, fantasy, and the uncanny while working on her masters in English literature. Caryn writes novels for teens and anyone else who likes a bit of the bizarre to mess up their day. When not writing, Caryn spends her time obsessively consuming other people’s stories, plotting travel adventures, and exploring artistic endeavors. She lives with her husband and a horde of surly and entitled animals in southern Alberta.

This One Looks Like a Boy

Inspiring and honest, this unique memoir of gender transition and coming-of-age proves it’s never too late to find your true identity.

Since he was a small child, Lorimer Shenher knew something for certain: he was a boy. The problem was, he was growing up in a girl’s body.

In this candid and thoughtful memoir, Shenher shares the story of his gender journey, from childhood gender dysphoria to teenage sexual experimentation to early-adult denial of his identity—and finally the acceptance that he is trans, culminating in gender reassignment surgery in his fifties. Along the way, he details his childhood in booming Calgary, his struggles with alcohol, and his eventual move to Vancouver, where he became the first detective assigned to the case of serial killer Robert Pickton (the subject of his critically acclaimed book That Lonely Section of Hell). With warmth and openness, This One Looks Like A Boy takes us through one of the most important decisions Shenher will ever make, as he comes into his own and finally discovers acceptance and relief.

  • Biography & Memoir
  • LGTBQ+
  • Nonfiction

Lorimer Shenher

Lorimer Shenher was born and raised in Calgary, living there until his move to Vancouver in 1991. Lorimer’s first love has always been writing. He worked as a copy runner for the Calgary Herald, before venturing off into the world of weekly newspapers in rural Alberta, working as a reporter and photographer covering the Junior Hockey, local crime and political beats. He joined the Vancouver Police Department as a constable in 1991, taking assignments in Patrol, Communications, the Prostitution Task Force, the Strike Force, Homicide/Missing Persons, Diversity Relations, Financial Crime, and the Threat Assessment Unit, including numerous undercover assignments. In 2013, Lorimer took medical leave from policing to receive treatment for a Post-Traumatic Stress Injury and continues to work toward recovery. He retired from the VPD in 2018.

In 2015, Greystone Books published That Lonely Section of Hell: The Botched Investigation of a Serial Killer Who Almost Got Away, Lorimer’s memoir of working on Vancouver’s Missing and Murdered Women file and an exploration of how the Vancouver Police Department failed to protect vulnerable people. It was named a 2015 Globe & Mail Top 100 Book. In 2015, Lorimer began a gender transition to male. He continues to write and in 2017 graduated with an MA in Professional Communications from Royal Roads University, winning the Founders Award for his cohort. His thesis project was an audio documentary called Where Did That Come From? Which explored the rise of the missing and murdered indigenous women as a major issue in the 2015 Canadian Federal Election.

His second book, This One Looks Like a Boy: My Gender Journey to Life as a Man releases from Greystone Books in March 2019. He currently lives with his family in Vancouver.

Dear Scarlet: The Story of My Postpartum Depression

In this intimate and moving graphic memoir, Teresa Wong writes and illustrates the story of her struggle with postpartum depression in the form of a letter to her daughter Scarlet. Equal parts heartbreaking and funny, Dear Scarlet perfectly captures the quiet desperation of those suffering from PPD and the profound feelings of inadequacy and loss. As Teresa grapples with her fears and anxieties and grasps at potential remedies, coping mechanisms, and her mother’s Chinese elixirs, we come to understand one woman’s battle against the cruel dynamics of postpartum depression.

Dear Scarlet is a poignant and deeply personal journey through the complexities of new motherhood, offering hope to those affected by PPD, as well as reassurance that they are not alone.

  • Biography & Memoir
  • Comics & Graphic Novels
  • Nonfiction

Teresa Wong

Teresa Wong is a Calgary-based writer and artist who had three children in less than five years. At first, she feared motherhood would destroy her but is pleasantly surprised to find herself continually remade. When the kids are asleep, she writes and draws pictures. When she is asleep, it’s never for long. Dear Scarlet is her first book.

The Death of Annie the Water Witcher by Lightning

Three years into the second millennium, Majestic, Alberta is a farm town dealing with weakened crop prices, international borders closing to Canadian beef, and a severe drought. Older farmers worry about their way of life changing while young people concoct ways to escape: drugs, partying, moving away. Even the church is on the brink of closing.

When local woman Annie Gallagher is struck by lightning while divining water for a well, stories of the town’s past, including that of Annie and the grandmother who taught her water witching, slowly emerge as everyone gathers for her funeral.

Told through the varied voices of the townspeople and Annie herself, The Death of Annie the Water Witcher by Lightning reveals Majestic to be a complex character in its own right, both haunted and haunting. Here, Audrey J. Whitson has written a novel of hard choices and magical necessity. It is as if the novels of Ami McKay took place in the West today.

  • Fiction

Audrey Whitson

Audrey J. Whitson’s first book, Teaching Places (Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2003), a memoir about how the land teaches, was shortlisted for the Wilfred Eggleston Award, Grant MacEwan Author Award and ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year (body/mind/spirit category). Stories from The Glorious Mysteries (Thistledown, 2013)—a collection set in Alberta, California, and Mexico—were shortlisted for the Howard O’Hagan Award and longlisted for the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award. Her latest book is The Death of Annie the Water Witcher by Lightning. Her poetry and essays have been published in many magazines and anthologies and have also won awards. Audrey lives in Edmonton. To learn more about her work, visit www.audreywhitson.com.

Fred Penner

A gentle giant with kind eyes and an undeniable ability to make you feel good about yourself, this musical master brings 45 years of commitment, consistency and depth to a career that skillfully blends the many genres of performing and communication. Whether it’s through CDs, videos, books or television, his cornerstone philosophy remains the same: absolute trust that his work can make a difference. He has released 13 albums with 10 JUNO Award nominations and three wins, spent 12 seasons (and nearly 950 episodes!) hosting the hit CBC TV show, Fred Penner’s Place, was first kid’s performer to headline the Los Angeles Amphitheater, is a Member of the Order of Canada and Member of the Order of Manitoba, and was an Ambassador for World Vision. But at the end of the day, Fred loves making music and connecting with audiences of all ages.