Lethbridge, Alberta

Saturday, September 23, 2017

Main Library: 5th Ave. S. and 8th St. S. | 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

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The Word On The Street has been renowned for the quality and diversity of its event programming and our next festival promises to offer the best so far. See our  line-up of incredible Canadian literary talent at The Word On The Street Lethbridge for 2017....

1:00 Signing: Eric Dyck, Trevor Herriot, Monia Mazigh, David Alexander Robertson, Margriet Ruurs

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

From Pianos To Power Chords: A Mini-Comic About Sounds in Southern Alberta

This comic strip adaptation of the Galt Museum & Archives’ exhibit, From Pianos To Power Chords, featuring writings from exhibit curator, Tyler J. Stewart, takes a deeper look at how music has helped to unite us. From the first static-filled radio broadcasts to the high-fidelity recordings of today, along with the garage bands, symphonies and late-night jam sessions in between, this exhibition showcases the sounds coming out of Southern Alberta.

  • Comics & Graphic Novels
  • Nonfiction

Eric Dyck

Eric Dyck is a cartoonist living & working in Lethbridge!  His comic strip, Slaughterhouse Slough, explores the history, vegetables, critters, and people of his new Southern Alberta home.  Eric’s comic stories are developed from research, interviews and eavesdropping.  Eric also teaches cartooning & comics classes for children and youth, and his freelance illustration work can also be found in magazines, coffee shops, farmer’s markets, and city hall.  In 2017, Eric adapted a Galt Museum exhibit, curated by Tyler J. Stewart, about music in Southern Alberta into a series of comic strips.  The collection of these comic strips, “From Pianos To Power Chords”, is available exclusively at the Galt Museum.

Towards a Prairie Atonement

Towards a Prairie Atonement addresses the question of our relationship with the land. Enlisting the help of a Metis Elder, Trevor Herriot revisits the history of one corner of the Great Plains.

This book’s lyrical blend of personal narrative, prairie history, imagery, and argument begins with the cause of protecting native grassland on community pastures. As the narrative unfolds, however, Herriot, the award-winning author of Grass, Sky, Song and River in a Dry Land, finds himself recruited into the work of reconciliation.

Facing his own responsibility as a descendent of settlers, he connects today’s ecological disarray to the legacy of Metis dispossession and the loss of their community lands. With Indigenous and settler people alienated from one another and from the grassland itself, hope and courage are in short supply. This book offers both by proposing an atonement that could again bring people and prairie together.

  • Nonfiction

Trevor Herriot

Trevor Herriot is an award-winning author and a naturalist. Married with four children, Trevor and his wife, Karen, have a home in Regina, Saskatchewan, and a small cabin in the Aspen Parkland prairie south of Indian Head.

Hope Has Two Daughters

Unwilling to endure a culture of silence and submission, and disowned by her family, Nadia leaves her native Tunisia in 1984 amidst deadly violence, chaos, and rioting brought on by rising food costs, eventually emigrating to Canada to begin her life.

More than twenty-five years later, Nadia’s daughter Lila reluctantly travels to Tunisia to learn about her mother’s birth country. While she’s there, she connects with Nadia’s childhood friends, Neila and Mounir. She uncovers agonizing truths about her mother’s life as a teenager and imagines what it might have been like to grow up in fear of political instability and social unrest. As she is making these discoveries, protests over poor economic conditions and lack of political freedom are increasing, and soon, Lila finds herself in the midst of another revolution — one that will inflame the country and change the Arab world, and her, forever.

Weaving together the voices of two women at two pivotal moments in history, the Tunisian Bread Riots in 1984 and the Jasmine Revolution in 2010, Hope Has Two Daughters is a bracing, vivid story that perfectly captures life inside revolution.

  • Fiction

Monia Mazigh

Monia Mazigh was born and raised in Tunisia and immigrated to Canada in 1991. She was catapulted onto the public stage in 2002 when her husband, Maher Arar, was deported to Syria where he was tortured and held without charge. She campaigned tirelessly for his release. Mazigh holds a Ph.D. in finance from McGill University. She is the National Coordinator of the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group. She has published a memoir, Hope and Despair, and her novel Mirrors and Mirages was a finalist for the Trillium Book Award in the original French.

Will I See?

Based on the story by Iskwé and Erin Leslie

May, a young teenage girl, traverses the city streets, finding keepsakes in different places along her journey. When May and her kookum make these keepsakes into a necklace, it opens a world of danger and fantasy. While May fights against a terrible reality, she learns that there is strength in the spirit of those who have passed. But will that strength be able to save her? A story of tragedy and beauty, Will I See? illuminates the issue of missing and murdered Indigenous women.

  • Comics & Graphic Novels
  • Indigenous
  • Young Adult

David Alexander Robertson

David Alexander Robertson is an award-winning writer who has long been an advocate for educating youth on Indigenous history and contemporary issues. He has written several graphic novels, including the bestselling 7 Generations series and Sugar Falls. His first novel, The Evolution of Alice, was winner of On the Same Page (2016). His bestselling children’s book, When We Were Alone, received honourable mention for the Alcuin Society Children’s Award and appears on CCBC Choices 2017 picture books for school-age children best-of-the-year list. David lives in Winnipeg with his wife and five children, where he works in the field of Indigenous education.

Stepping Stones

This unique picture book was inspired by the stone artwork of Syrian artist Nizar Ali Badr, discovered by chance by Canadian children’s writer Margriet Ruurs. The author was immediately impressed by the strong narrative quality of Mr. Badr’s work, and, using many of Mr. Badr’s already-created pieces, she set out to create a story about the Syrian refugee crisis. Stepping Stones tells the story of Rama and her family, who are forced to flee their once-peaceful village to escape the ravages of the civil war raging ever closer to their home. With only what they can carry on their backs, Rama and her mother, father, grandfather and brother, Sami, set out to walk to freedom in Europe. Nizar Ali Badr’s stunning stone images illustrate the story.

  • Children's

Margriet Ruurs

Margriet Ruurs is the author of many award-winning books for children. She enjoys speaking about reading and writing to students at schools around the world. Her adventures have taken her to such countries as Myanmar, Pakistan, Laos, Tanzania and many others. Margriet was born in The Netherlands but has been a Canadian for most of her life. She lives with her family on Salt Spring Island, British Columbia