Toronto, Ontario

Sunday, September 24, 2017

Harbourfront Centre | 11:00 am - 6:00 pm

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For the past 27 years, The Word On The Street has been renowned for the quality and diversity of its event programming. See the lineup of incredible Canadian literary talent that appeared at our 28th festival on September 24, 2017  

Extraordinary Stories

4:15 PM - 4:45 PM

What does it look like when tropes from science fiction are explored through Indigenous narratives and traditional stories? Cherie Dimaline and Drew Hayden Taylor present an epic collection of stories from coast to coast, and Nathan Adler brings his bone-chilling tale of monsters, family, and secrets.

mitêwâcimowina: Indigenous Science Fiction and Speculative Storytelling

The 1960s and the 1970s ushered in a massive revitalization of Indigenous consciousness, culture, and stories. Indigenous publications of the 1970s were often grounded in traditional stories and also in voicing Indigenous experiences. Moving on in time, Theytus Books’ publication of The Black Ship by Gerry William in 1994 marked the first Indigenous science fiction novel in Canada. Theytus is now publishing this first Indigenous science fiction anthology in Canada. It is hoped that this book will both draw upon the power of traditional stories, and also upon the vast narrative imagination of Indigenous peoples, embodied in contemporary sci-fi and speculative storytelling.

  • Fantasy/Sci-fi | Fantastique/Science-fiction
  • Short Stories | Nouvelles

Drew Hayden Taylor

Drew Hayden Taylor is an award-winning playwright, novelist, scriptwriter and columnist. He has done everything from performing stand up comedy at the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C. to being Artistic Director of Native Earth Performing Arts. His 30th book comes out in January and he currently lives on the Curve Lake First Nation in Ontario.

mitêwâcimowina: Indigenous Science Fiction and Speculative Storytelling

The 1960s and the 1970s ushered in a massive revitalization of Indigenous consciousness, culture, and stories. Indigenous publications of the 1970s were often grounded in traditional stories and also in voicing Indigenous experiences. Moving on in time, Theytus Books’ publication of The Black Ship by Gerry William in 1994 marked the first Indigenous science fiction novel in Canada. Theytus is now publishing this first Indigenous science fiction anthology in Canada. It is hoped that this book will both draw upon the power of traditional stories, and also upon the vast narrative imagination of Indigenous peoples, embodied in contemporary sci-fi and speculative storytelling.

  • Fantasy/Sci-fi | Fantastique/Science-fiction
  • Short Stories | Nouvelles

Cherie Dimaline

Cherie Dimaline is a Métis author and editor whose award-winning fiction has been published and anthologized internationally. Her first book, Red Rooms, was published in 2007 and her novel The Girl Who Grew a Galaxy was released in 2013. In 2014, she was named the Emerging Artist of the Year at the Ontario Premier’s Award for Excellence in the Arts, and became the first Aboriginal Writer in Residence for the Toronto Public Library. Her book A Gentle Habit was published in August 2016.

Wrist

Wrist follows the story of dinosaur hunters who, in 1872, become embroiled in a battle over the discovery of fossils in Northern Ontario as their excavation crews are driven mad by a bizarre and terrifying illness. Over a hundred years later, Church and his family show signs of the same monstrous affliction. As he begins to unravel his family’s dark history, Church must race to protect the secrets buried deep in bones and blood.

  • Fiction

Nathan Adler

Nathan Adler is the author of Wrist, an Indigenous monster story written from the monster’s perspective (Kegedonce Press). He is a writer and artist who works in many different mediums, including audio & video, drawing & painting, as well as glass. He is Anishinaabe and Jewish, a member of Lac Des Mille Lacs First Nation, an MFA candidate for Creative Writing from UBC, and resides in Mono, Ontario.